Updating xml clob in oracle who is sanaa lathan dating now

ABANDA-2007040105174348ABANDA-2007040205181412ABANDA-2007041106302127ABANDA-2007041405283313ABANDA-2007040105264865ABANDA-2007040400350593ABANDA-2007041402364776ABANDA-2007041704324786columns Date Created varchar2(100) path '@Date Created', Reference varchar2(100) path 'Reference', Requestor varchar2(100) path 'Requestor', "User" varchar2(100) path 'User', Cost Center varchar2(100) path 'Cost Center', Special Instructions varchar2(100) path 'Special Instructions' ) columns Date Created varchar2(100) path '@Date Created', Reference varchar2(100) path 'Reference', Requestor varchar2(100) path 'Requestor',"User" varchar2(100) path 'User', Cost Center varchar2(100) path 'Cost Center', Special Instructions varchar2(100) path 'Special Instructions' as "xsi"), 'Purchase Order' passing xf.filecontent columns name varchar2(100) path 'Shipping Instructions/name', shipping_address varchar2(100) path 'Shipping Instructions/address', telephone varchar2(100) path 'Shipping Instructions/telephone' ) Shipping Instructions; as "xsi"), 'Purchase Order/Line Items/Line Item' passing xf.filecontent columns Item Number varchar2(100) path '@Item Number', Part_Description varchar2(100) path 'Part/@Description', Unit Price number path 'Part/@Unit Price', Quantity number path 'Quantity' ) Shipping Instructions; as "xsi"), 'Purchase Order' passing xf.filecontent columns Date Created varchar2(100) path '@Date Created', Reference varchar2(100) path 'Reference', Requestor varchar2(100) path 'Requestor', "User" varchar2(100) path 'User', Cost Center varchar2(100) path 'Cost Center', Special Instructions varchar2(100) path 'Special Instructions' ) Purchase Order; You can create indexes on your XML data, to focus on particular parts of it that you query often, and thus improve performance.

XMLIndex provides a general, XML-specific index that indexes the internal structure of XML data.

The XMLType object type includes constructors that accept many different data types, including VARCHAR2, CLOB, BFILE, and REF CURSOR.

One of the biggest change that Oracle has made in 11g is the introduction of the new “binary” XMLType.The binary XMLType is the third method of storing data in Oracle database; the first two being “structured” and “unstructured”.The datatype to hold XML in PL/SQL or in the database is XMLTYPE. So you can use the generated XML in PL/SQL, store it in table (XMLTYPE column), transform it to a CLOB (using the XMLTYPE get Clob Val member function which I use in the examples) and write it to a file. At this point, the file is assumed to contain a valid XML document, but the contents have not been checked for validity (more on this later).

If you would like to see the contents of the document, you can simply select the XMLType column: table, what should you do with it?

The DBMS_XMLDOM package is a bit more complicated as you’ll have to create the entire document by calling functions and procedures of the package.

The following example creates an XML document with the department information retrieved from the query.

------------------------------ ----------------------- ------ -------- XMLDATA BINARY FILE LOB IN CSID NUMBER IN SCHEMA VARCHAR2 IN DEFAULT VALIDATED NUMBER IN DEFAULT WELLFORMED NUMBER IN DEFAULT As you can see, the first two parameters are required, and the next three parameters are optional.

The following PL/SQL block uses this constructor without the optional parameters to instantiate an XMLType object and insert it into the /* create directory to point to where XML docs are stored */ CREATE DIRECTORY xml_data AS 'c:\alan\OReilly\2nd_Edition'; DECLARE bfl BFILE; BEGIN /* attach XML document purch_to bfile locator */ bfl := BFILENAME('XML_DATA', 'purch_ord.xml'); /* add to purchase_order table */ INSERT INTO purchase_order (po_id, purchase_order_doc) VALUES (1000, XMLTYPE(bfl, nls_charset_id('WE8MSWIN1252'))); COMMIT; END; table now contains a record with the contents of the purch_file stored as a CLOB.

You can create a ref cursor and pass on this ref cursor to the XMLTYPE constructor like this: DECLARE l_refcursor SYS_REFCURSOR; l_xmltype XMLTYPE; BEGIN OPEN l_refcursor FOR SELECT department_id , department_name FROM departments WHERE department_id IN (10,20); l_xmltype := XMLTYPE(l_refcursor); dbms_output.put_line(l_Clob Val); END; /DECLARE l_xmltype XMLTYPE; BEGIN l_xmltype := dbms_xmlgen.getxmltype('SELECT department_id , department_name FROM departments WHERE department_id IN (10,20)' ); dbms_output.put_line(l_Clob Val); END; /DECLARE l_xmltype XMLTYPE; l_ctx dbms_xmlgen.ctxhandle; BEGIN l_ctx := dbms_xmlgen.newcontext('SELECT department_id , department_name FROM departments WHERE department_id in (10,20)' ); dbms_xmlgen.setrowsettag(l_ctx, 'Departments'); dbms_xmlgen.setrowtag(l_ctx, 'Dept'); l_xmltype := dbms_Xml Type(l_ctx) ; dbms_xmlgen.close Context(l_ctx); dbms_output.put_line(l_Clob Val); End; / With the XMLTYPE constructor and DBMS_XMLGEN package, you can create simple XML documents, fast and easy.