Looking for love the business of online dating

match is the most widely-used online dating site in the world and has nearly 1.8 million subscribers.It works in the most traditional way: Simply create a profile, check out your potential matches, send them a few messages and then arrange to meet for a date.

looking for love the business of online dating-67

Raissa Tona and Wale Ayeni, recent graduates of Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business, believe so.They’ve just created a location-based app called MELD, available on i Tunes and Google Play, that caters to college-educated black singles.Lovebook offers three packages, which promise different levels of Facebook reach.With First Date, customers will receive a minimum of five "leads", in the form of Likes or direct messages.This means that the ads could reach Facebook users that would not be found on traditional dating sites, such as celebrities, James claims.

"If you have the same interests as Kim Kardashian or a Premier League footballer, you could end up on their page," he says.With the industry expected to grow by another 0 million every year through 2019, analysts say the dating game is increasingly becoming a battle of the ages, with both sides hoping their age-based gambles yield the most profit from those looking for love.It’s not clear that the young and perky are the best market for corporate matchmakers.When OKCupid analyzed its own data, it found that black men and women get fewer responses than their counterparts from other ethnic groups. Last year, data from Facebook’s dating app, Are You Interested, showed exactly the same result: The odds on online dating sites are consistently stacked against black users.Several sites have sprung up to cater specifically to the black community, including Black People Meet, Black Planet, and Black Singles.Tinder, America’s fast-growing online-dating juggernaut, last week unveiled its first big branding partnership aimed at its core audience of millennial fling-seekers: a neon-drenched video-ad campaign hyping Bud Light’s mega-keg party, “Whatever, USA.” Meanwhile, over at Tinder’s less-youthful rival e Harmony, a recent ad saw its 80-year-old founder counseling a single woman besieged by bridesmaid’s invitations to take some time (and, of course, the site’s 200-question compatibility quiz) to find that special someone: “Beth, do you want fast or forever?