Abuse in adolecent dating in canada

by Tina Hotton Mahony Prevalence of police-reported dating violence Victims of dating violence most likely to be female Differences in rates of dating violence between the sexes decline with age Increase in police-reported rates of dating violence Common assault most likely offence in dating violence Similar proportion of male and female victims of dating violence sustained injuries More than 4 in 10 incidents of dating violence occur in the victim's home Dating violence involving female victims more likely to lead to charges Homicides perpetrated in dating relationships Summary Methodology Detailed data tables References Notes According to results of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), approximately 71% of youth in Canada report being in a dating relationship by the age of 15.Among those that have engaged in a dating relationship, 55% had their first dating relationship by the age of 12.

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The literature on IPV among adolescents indicates that the rates are similar for the number of girls and boys in heterosexual relationships who report experiencing IPV, or that girls in heterosexual relationships are more likely than their male counterparts to report perpetrating IPV. stated that, unlike domestic violence in general, equal rates of IPV perpetration is a unique characteristic with regard adolescent dating violence, and that this is "perhaps because the period of adolescence, a special developmental state, is accompanied by sexual characteristics that are distinctly different from the characteristics of adult." Wekerle and Wolfe theorized that "a mutually coercive and violent dynamic may form during adolescence, a time when males and females are more equal on a physical level" and that this "physical equality allows girls to assert more power through physical violence than is possible for an adult female attacked by a fully physically mature man." Regarding studies that indicate that girls are as likely or more likely than boys to commit IPV, the authors emphasize that substantial differences exist between the genders, including that girls are significantly more likely than boys to report having experienced severe IPV, such as being threatened with a weapon, punched, strangled, beaten, burned, or raped, and are also substantially more likely than boys to need psychological help or experience physical injuries that require medical help for the abuse, and to report sexual violence as a part of dating violence.They are also more likely to take IPV more seriously.This report examines the prevalence and characteristics of incidents of police-reported dating violence in Canada.has conducted extensive research during the development of its dating violence prevention programs.Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been a well examined and documented phenomenon in adults; however, there has not been nearly as much study on violence in adolescent dating relationships, and it is therefore not as well understood.

The research has mainly focused on Caucasian youth, and there are yet no studies which focus specifically on IPV in adolescent same-sex romantic relationships.By contrast, boys are more likely to report experiencing less severe acts, such as being pinched, slapped, scratched or kicked.Girls are more likely to report committing less serious forms of IPV, including as a means of self-defense, whereas boys are more likely to report committing more severe acts of IPV, including threats, physical violence and controlling a partner.Surveys which provide this information include the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), the National Population Health Survey (NPHS) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).According to information drawn from the Canadian Community Health Survey and the National Population Health Survey, in 2005 43% of teens aged 15 to 19 reported that they had had sexual intercourse at least once (down from 47% in 1996–1997).The 1993 Violence Against Women Survey (VAWS) found that 16% of women had experienced physical or sexual violence in a dating relationship since the age of 16.